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Client Profile: Ti Training

 

The Problem

Around the world, law enforcement officers are put in dangerous situations every day. How they handle those situations and make split-second decisions can often be the difference between life and death. But no amount of studying from a book or even time at a gun range can adequately train the officers for what to expect in those dangerous scenarios. They need practice and training that’s as close to real life as possible.

The Solution

Recognizing the need for effective training, Greg Otte and six of his then-co-workers left another simulation provider to launch Golden-based Ti Training in 2006 and created The Training Lab. The Training Lab is a high-tech, industry-leading use-of-force simulator. The simulator allows users to practice using a range of force options, including TASERs, batons and commonly used firearms. The system is pre-loaded with more than 500 scenarios and gives users the ability to customize them to their own specifications. The system can be used by up to 18 participants and includes low-light simulation.

Recognizing that they had created a valuable product, the founders of Ti Training sought to trademark their company and product names. Ti Training has relied on the expertise of attorneys at Leyendecker & Lemire for the successful issue of seven trademarks with another pending and Otte describes the experience as “fantastic.”

L&L has also filed two patents that are pending for Ti Training. The intellectual property protection that L&L has helped Ti Training receive has helped the company sell its product to law enforcement agencies worldwide with confidence of knowing their intellectual property is secure.

Learn more about how Leyendecker & Lemire can help with your trademark and patent needs.

By |May 20th, 2015|CLIENT STORIES|Comments Off on Client Profile: Ti Training

Client Profile: Modern Christmas Trees

The Problem

Everyone knows what a Christmas tree looks like — at least in the traditional sense. They are evergreen trees — or synthetic, evergreen-looking trees — of varying types and sizes, decorated with ornaments and lights. Though each person adds their own touch to the decorating, Christmas trees are all basically the same. And at the end of the season, families lug the heavy tree to the curb or do their best to shove the fake tree into a cardboard box, hopeful that they don’t bend or break any branches for the following year.

The Solution

Lawrence “Bud” Stoecker was an architect and engineer who built A-frame homes in the Rocky Mountains in the middle of the century. Because money was tight, he would often make things instead of buying them and a family favorite was his unique Christmas tree. Matt Bliss grew up enjoying the creativity and modernity of the unique Christmas tree his grandfather built. Stoecker kept painstaking records, including notes, photos and pattern details of every part of the tree’s design each year, refining the tree’s design through the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s. His grandson, Matt, reviewed his grandfather’s designs and used them as inspiration for his own sleek Christmas trees in the shape of an A-frame, like homes his grandfather designed during his career. Bliss wanted to patent his tree, to solve the dilemma of having a Christmas tree that looks like everyone else’s and how to store it. The tree is a work of art and is utterly unique, made of acrylic and ball chain. It weighs just 15 pounds fully decorated and collapses flat for storing.

Bliss met with several patent attorneys to discuss the likelihood of obtaining a patent on his grandfather’s tree. He felt that the attorneys at Leyendecker & Lemire seemed like the smartest he had encountered and felt that teaming with them gave him the most reasonable chance of getting the patent. He was right. Bliss obtained a patent for the Modern Tree in 2012 and followed up by returned to L&L for assistance in obtaining a patent for a half tree, which he also received in 2015.

Bliss says his experience with L&L has been great and they are wonderful communicators and problem solvers who gave Bliss the opportunity to obtain the appropriate intellectual property protections without wasting any money.

“The intellectual property rights they have helped me obtain have given me the confidence to take my product to the market knowing I have protection,” Bliss says.

Learn more about how Leyendecker & Lemire can help you with your patent.

By |May 20th, 2015|CLIENT STORIES|Comments Off on Client Profile: Modern Christmas Trees

Law Firm Leyendecker & Lemire Announces New Client Trademarks, One Patent

AKA Biker Chick, Ti Training, Luggage Table receive approval

April 22, 2015

GREENWOOD VILLAGE, Colo. — Leyendecker & Lemire, LLC, a law firm providing intellectual property (IP) and business-related legal services to entrepreneurs, individual inventors and businesses of all sizes, announces two new trademarks and one patent recently represented by the firm and registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

Wendy Mainerich of AKA Biker Chick LLC in Littleton, was awarded a trademark on Feb. 24 for AKA Biker Chick. The trademarked phrase is used on motorcycle-themed merchandise that Mainerich’s business sells online. Contact Wendy at chopperchick66@hotmail.com.

Meanwhile, on March 10, Ti Training Corp. of Golden received a trademark for Expand Your Range. The company will use the trademarked phrase for its computerized shooting simulator used for sports and law enforcement training. The company has received seven trademarks with the help of Leyendecker & Lemire and has another pending as well as patents. Joe Mason of Ti Training can be reached at joe@titraining.com.

In the interest of helping travelers use items outside of their packed luggage more easily, Gary Jones and Angela Foster of Lakewood have patented a luggage table. The pair received patent approval for the luggage table on Feb. 17. Based on the pair’s filings, the luggage table could be secured to the top of a suitcase, creating a flat, sometimes frictioned surface, allowing travelers to use tablets, phones, food and other items with ease and keep them in a convenient location near themselves, rather than having to set items on a terminal floor or other less-than-ideal spot. Contact Gary Jones at garyjones04@msn.com.

“It is wonderful to work with such dedicated entrepreneurs,” says Founding Partner Kurt Leyendecker. “We receive great satisfaction from knowing that we are able to help them secure and protect their ideas, allowing the entrepreneurs to be confident in knowing they can focus solely on their business.”

For further information about trademarks and the Leyendecker & Lemire, LLC Law Firm, contact Kurt Leyendecker directly at 303.768.0641 or kurt@coloradoiplaw.com. Learn more about Leyendecker & Lemire, LLC at www.coloradoiplaw.com.

Leyendecker & Lemire on Twitter:

http://twitter.com/leyendeckerlemi

Leyendecker & Lemire on Facebook:

http://www.facebook.com/LeyendeckerAndLemire

By |April 22nd, 2015|FIRM NEWS|Comments Off on Law Firm Leyendecker & Lemire Announces New Client Trademarks, One Patent

SupCo trademark game-changer

Take care around trials and appeals

By Peter Lemire

A recent decision by the Supreme Court will have attorneys and business paying more attention to what are known as “adversary proceedings” before the United States Patent and Trademark Trial and Appeals Board (TTAB).

Adversary proceedings are basically mini administrative trials that are conducted when one party believes that it will be harmed by the USPTO allowing the registration of a trademark to a third party. There are two forms of adversary proceedings: oppositions and cancellations. An opposition is when a third party objects to the registration of a mark prior to the granting of the registration.

A cancellation action is identical to an opposition, but it occurs after a registration has already been issued and the third party is seeking to cancel the registration. While these proceedings have for the most part been taken seriously, the Supreme Court decision in B&B Hardware, Inc. v. Hargis Industries, Inc. has exponentially raised the stakes due to the fact that the court ruled that a TTAB decision regarding whether there exists a likelihood of confusion between two trademarks can in some cases have a preclusive effect (meaning that the TTAB decision would be binding in the later infringement action) in a subsequent trademark infringement litigation.

Read more at ColoradoBiz Magazine.

By |April 7th, 2015|INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, PATENTS, TRADEMARKS|Comments Off on SupCo trademark game-changer

Law Firm Leyendecker & Lemire Announces New Client Trademarks, One Patent

Hydro Physics, Campo Norte and Coverplug receive approval

Feb. 26, 2015

GREENWOOD VILLAGE, Colo. — Leyendecker & Lemire, LLC, a law firm providing intellectual property (IP) and business-related legal services to entrepreneurs, individual inventors and businesses of all sizes, announces two new trademarks and one patent recently represented by the firm and registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

On Jan. 6, Thomas Suiter, president of video pipe inspection company Hydro Physics of Englewood, received a patent for his hose handling system and its methods of use. The system was designed for handling and cleaning hoses and lines as they are removed from sanitary or storm sewers. Hoses and other lines are often put into sewers and other drains in order to clean, repair and inspect sewer systems, and when they are removed, can expose personnel and equipment to contaminants such as human or animal excrement, medical waste, toxins and bacteria. Suiter’s invention includes a hose handling system that has a hose guide, including a pulley installed on a frame, and a spray nozzle adapted to dispense a wash mixture. The hose guide is adapted to guide a hose as the hose is inserted into or withdrawn from a manhole, with the hose running along the pulley. The wash can be delivered through a wash line to the hose guide, which sprays the mixture on the hose in order to reduce or eliminate contamination. For more information, Suiter can be contacted at 303-884-7552 or tjs@hydro-physics.com.

ADI Enterprises, LLC of Brighton, Colo., recently trademarked the name Campo Norte® for use on clothing. Translated to English, the words mean “north field,” and founder Andrea Irwin said Campo Norte is a startup brand designed for “the young and active Hispanic male.” The company’s goal is to bring opportunities to young Latinos and help them become proficient sales people, while others involved may be artists who join the team. The trademark was approved on Jan. 20. Irwin can be contacted at camponorte62@gmail.com

On Feb. 3, Coverplug Corp. of Centennial received a federal trademark for its name. The name Coverplug® will be used on the company’s electrical outlet covers, which are durable, molded and paintable plastic panels that plug into electrical sockets to cover the entire outlet. The covers are crafted using a specially designed plastic that can easily be painted to match your walls, thus hiding and child-proofing any necessary outlets. For more information, contact Steve Moore of Coverplug at sales@coverplug.com.

“Our firm and clients are off to a great start this year,” says Founding Partner Peter C. Lemire. “It’s exciting to be able to help hard-working entrepreneurs like T.J., Andrea and Steve be rewarded for their creativity and innovative thinking, and we look forward to continuing to build on our relationships with them.”

For further information about trademarks and the Leyendecker & Lemire, LLC Law Firm, contact Peter C. Lemire directly at 303.768.0641 or peter@coloradoiplaw.com. Learn more about Leyendecker & Lemire, LLC at www.coloradoiplaw.com.

Leyendecker & Lemire on Twitter:

http://twitter.com/leyendeckerlemi

Leyendecker & Lemire on Facebook:

http://www.facebook.com/LeyendeckerAndLemire

By |February 26th, 2015|FIRM NEWS|Comments Off on Law Firm Leyendecker & Lemire Announces New Client Trademarks, One Patent

Trademarks + marketing = power

Take Ford, for example

By Kurt Leyendecker

Anyone who has watched even a small amount of television over the past year or so is probably familiar with the Ford commercials featuring Mike Rowe of Dirty Jobs fame pitching cars with engines that utilize EcoBoost® technology.

EcoBoost engines are those that offer power comparable with that of their larger counterparts but do so at about a 20 percent improvement in fuel efficiency. The two most prominent examples of EcoBoost technology are the 4-cylinder engine in the new Ford Mustang that produces over 300 hp and the V6 engine in the F-150 that produces 365 hp as well as oodles of torque for hauling and towing. Both engines offer significant improvements in rated MPG over larger available engines not incorporating the technology.

The EcoBoost engines have been tremendously successful for Ford and are now being rolled out in more sizes and being made available for more cars in the manufacturer’s lineup. Ford’s skillful marketing and education campaign has been able to convince even skeptical truck buyers that the old adage “there is no replacement for displacement” may no longer be true. Ford has even been able to charge more for smaller displacement EcoBoost engines than its larger counterparts, thus turning a legacy of more than 50 years of automotive sales tradition on its head.

Read more at ColoradoBiz Magazine.

By |February 20th, 2015|BLOGGING, TRADEMARKS|Comments Off on Trademarks + marketing = power

Patent Case Study: Hoggle Goggles

The Problem

Here in Colorado, snow sports are a way of life. You impatiently wait for the first snowflake to fly. Once it does and the slopes open for the season, you take to the mountains as if your life depends on it. One piece of equipment you never forget to pack in the Subaru are your goggles–your eyes depend on them. A $600 pair of scratched goggles can ruin a highly anticipated day, but carrying the case with you as you careen down the slopes can be a hazard. So how do you keep them safe?

The Solution

What if there were a way to safely carry your goggles’ case with you? Imagine a storage system for your goggles so discreet you don’t even know it’s there. Enter the Hoggle Goggle. Hoggle Goggle is a convenient, self-storage lens cover/cleaning cloth system. Your goggle bag is stored right on your goggle strap. Hoggle Goggle is designed to attach expertly to any goggle-helmet system.

Lara Young, of Telluride, Colo., along with her best friends, Candice Good and Michelle Kustes, make up the Hoggle Goggle team. Young is a proven strategic planner and business consultant in resource development; Good is a physical therapist and product tester for the ski and climbing industry; and Kustes has a 20-year background as an accessory buyer and outdoor industry representative.

Young, Kustes and Good approached Leyendecker & Lemire, LLC to help the team secure a U.S. patent for the goggle storage system. Founded by Kurt Leyendecker and Peter Lemire, the Greenwood Village law firm provides intellectual property (IP) and business-related legal serves to entrepreneurs, individuals and businesses of all sizes. Leyendecker & Lemire guided the inventors through the complicated and intricate patent process. Their patent is currently pending.

Telluradical Inc., a Telluride, Colo. company owned by Young, now manufactures and sells the Hoggle Goggle. Hoggle Goggle is made of high-quality, durable, soft and scratchproof micro-fiber materials in unique and colorful designs. For more information, visit www.hogglegoggle.com.

By |January 20th, 2015|CLIENT STORIES|Comments Off on Patent Case Study: Hoggle Goggles

Patent Case Study: Insta Flap

The Problem

The average car driver, speeding around trucks and tractor-trailers, probably does not give much thought to the large, waving mud flaps behind the tires of those larger, slower moving vehicles. Those flaps, however, are vital for keeping rocks, debris, water and road slop from flying up and out from under those big wheels. A necessity for trucks, mud flaps, however, can also be a hindrance for truck drivers. They are big, heavy and can make it difficult to access wheels and tires for repair.

Ask any truck driver who has had to pull over on a highway in a snowstorm to install chains on the wheels. Suddenly the useful mud flaps become a major obstacle. Lying on a wet, icy or snow-packed road while installing chains is unpleasant enough, without struggling to get access to the tires around the mud flaps. Consequently, chains are often improperly installed. They can be damaged or fall off the vehicle, leading to unsafe driving conditions.

The Solution

What if truck mud flaps could be removed in seconds without the use of any tools? What if drivers could easily take off the flaps, install chains or do any tire/vehicle repair and snap the flaps back on?

Inventors Raymond Cross of Redstone, Colo., and Frank Dan Prazen of Marble, Colo., worked together to create a simple system for mud flap removal. Their design involved a two-part bracket assembly that includes a piece that is affixed to the vehicle or trailer and a removable piece that is hooked up to the mud flap. Together, the pieces hold the flap securely to the vehicle, but the removable piece can be easily disengaged to take down the mud flap. The design enables a person to remove a mud flap from a big rig in a matter of seconds, without using any tools.

Cross and Prazen approached Leyendecker & Lemire, LLC for assistance in securing a U.S. patent for their bracket assembly. Founded by Kurt Leyendecker and Peter Lemire, the Greenwood Village law firm provides intellectual property (IP) and business-related legal serves to entrepreneurs, individuals and businesses of all sizes. Leyendecker & Lemire guided the inventors through the complicated and intricate patent process. Their patent was successfully approved in November 2013.

Insta Flap, a Glenwood Springs, Colo. company founded by Cross and Prazen, now sells the bracket assembly sets that are heavy duty and rust free. They are made in America out of top quality stainless steel. No more tools are needed to remove the flaps after the initial four-bolt installation. Drivers can change their mud flaps or get new ones and still use the Insta Flap for years to come. The device contributes to road safety – something to think about the next time you pass that big rig.

By |January 20th, 2015|CLIENT STORIES|Comments Off on Patent Case Study: Insta Flap

Leyendecker & Lemire Announces Three New Client Trademarks

Firedough® and  Ti Outdoors® procured

Jan. 20, 2015

GREENWOOD VILLAGE, Colo. — Leyendecker & Lemire, LLC, an intellectual property and business law firm providing intellectual property (IP) and business-related legal services to entrepreneurs, individual inventors, and businesses of all sizes, announces three new trademarks recently represented by the firm and registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

S & W Food Chain Corporation of Centennial, Colo., recently trademarked the name Firedough® for its Mediterranean and Middle Eastern cuisine restaurant of the same name. The restaurant is located at 10639 E. Briarwood Ave., Suite A2 in Centennial, and boasts a menu satisfies gluten-free, vegan and vegetarian diets, and those who count calories with their calorie counting system. Most items on the menu are from family recipes and made in-house. The facility is group-, business- and family-friendly. Catering is also available, as is a delivery service. Contact the restaurant or owner Bob Srour directly at 303-799-0003 for more information or visit www.firedough.com for a full menu. Franchises are also available. The trademark was successfully filed on Dec. 16, 2014.

Ti Training Corporation of Golden, Colo., federally trademarked Ti Outdoors® and TI Outdoors®, a subsidiary of Ti Training Corp. for a computerized multimedia simulation training system for shooting range owners. Ti Training Corp. took a force training simulator (www.titraining.com) outdoors to simulate real-life, real-time hunting with competitive sport shooting courses, weapons education and training, and an entertainment shooting gallery featuring zombies, clowns, gangsters and aliens. A wide range of scenarios and weapons is available to increase the shooter’s experience. More information is available online at www.tioutdoors.com. The trademark was successfully filed on Dec. 30, 2014.

“Leyendecker & Lemire represents clients in a broad range of industries as exemplified here,” says Founding Partner Peter C. Lemire. “It is rewarding for us to be able to help our clients achieve their goals and protect the businesses that they have built.”

For further information about trademarks and the Leyendecker & Lemire, LLC Law Firm, contact Peter C. Lemire directly at 303.768.0641 or peter@coloradoiplaw.com. Learn more about Leyendecker & Lemire, LLC, Law Firm at the website at www.coloradoiplaw.com.

Leyendecker & Lemire on Twitter:

http://twitter.com/leyendeckerlemi

Leyendecker & Lemire on Facebook:

http://www.facebook.com/LeyendeckerAndLemire

By |January 20th, 2015|FIRM NEWS|Comments Off on Leyendecker & Lemire Announces Three New Client Trademarks

Kick-starting the new year

Crowdfunding might be just what your business needs

By Peter Lemire

When meeting with clients, we often explain to them that securing intellectual property rights of inventions or products is an important step of the process, but it is just the start and sometimes is the easiest part of bringing a product to market or starting a new business venture. Millions of great ideas are conceived every day; however, just because something is a great idea does not guarantee success.

Business owners face major obstacles, including the practical realities of bringing the product to market and generating sufficient consumer awareness to sustain the business. Previously, this could be a monumental task that dooms many business ventures. However, the advent of crowdfunding sources may make the process of exposing a product to the market and making that initial purchase of inventory easier.

Crowdfunding websites such as www.kickstarter.com have existed for a few years, but I never seriously considered participating in a Kickstarter project. In the early days many of the projects revolved around funding the arts – projects included independent films, musicians seeking to fund albums, and projects to launch or revive TV shows. In exchange, benefactors generally would receive tickets to the premier, copies of the film or CD or other associated swag.

Read more at ColoradoBiz Magazine.

By |January 16th, 2015|BLOGGING, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY|Comments Off on Kick-starting the new year